Experience Midnight Sun in Norway

If there is one country on this planet that leaves me gasping at every bend it has to be Norway. During my 10 day trip to this country a few years ago, I could not experience the Midnight Sun since I was delayed but it has been on my wish list for long.

Imagine a day that never ends; Like a prolonged sunset and sunrise all at once, the midnight sun colours heaven and earth in a reddish yellow light. It’s tempting to wonder about all the sights and experiences that have been made under the midnight sun through the ages – by people living off the sea at the Lofoten and Vesterålen archipelagos, or the Sami reindeer herders of the far north.Norway Midnight Sun

The earth is rotating at a tilted axis relative to the sun, and during the summer months the North Pole is angled towards our star. That’s why, for several weeks, the sun never sets above the Arctic Circle and Northern Norway experiences 76 days of midnight sun between May and July and a must experience by every traveler. Going there, you can live these moments yourself:

Doing a whale safari, or exploring the wilderness inland, takes on a new dimension at night in the summer months, when you literally get to see the nature and wildlife in a different light. If you’re not afraid of the sometimes chilly summer nights in the north, you could try a midnight swim – or you can pitch your tent in the wild and stay up while the sun doesn’t go down. Many sights and activities are open at night during these weeks, so you can do midnight golfing, cycling, river paddling or sea kayaking, or maybe just find a quiet spot to fish. If you travel to the arctic islands of Svalbard, the sun doesn’t set between April and late August. Here you can do a midnight walk on a glacier or look at the reddish sky from a moving dogsled, experiencing the unique climate and nature near the North Pole.

The phenomena has at least made a lasting impression on several Norwegian artists and writers. This excerpt is from Knut Hamsuns Pan (1894):

“Night was coming on again; the sun just dipped into the sea and rose again, red, refreshed, as if it had been down to drink. I could feel more strangely on those nights than anyone would believe”

Approximate dates when you can see the midnight sun:-

The Arctic Circle :                                         12 June – 1 July

Bodø:                                                                  4 June – 8 July

Svolvær:                                                            28 May – 14 July

Harstad:                                                          25 May – 18 July

Bardufoss:                                                       23 May – 19 July

Andendes:                                                        22 May – 21 July

Tromsø:                                                            20 May – 22 July

Bossekopp:                                                    19 May – 24 July

Vardø:                                                             17 May – 26 July

Hammerfest:                                                16 May – 27 July

Berlevåg:                                                         15 May – 28 July

The North Cape:                                           14 May – 29 July

Longyearbyen:                                              20 April – 22 August

For further information: http://www.visitnorway.com. This post has been published in association with Scandinavian Tourism Board

Click the below to get a glimpse of my travels in Norway:


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